“Tiny” Text

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“Tiny” Text

Does it seem like oversized typography is a thing of the past? Smaller, almost “tiny” text has begun to replace the big bold headers that have been a website design staple for a while now. From smaller headlines to body text that seems sparse, there’s been a definite trend in typography downsizing.

While there might be some concerns about readability when it comes to small text sizes, particularly for body text, smaller fonts are not a bad thing. Oversized typography had almost started trending toward garish with sizes and lettering that was almost too big to read with ease.

Smaller typefaces feel somewhat softer and give the design more space for other elements for the eye to move around to. The trick to effectiveness with small type is to keep lettering to a minimum. Without a lot to read, this trend can be effective and interesting. On the other hand, with large blocks of type tiny type gets lost and can hinder the user’s ability to read with ease and scan copy efficiently.

Balance is a concern as well. All of the typefaces have to scale down somewhat to create a nice sense of harmony. Moonfarmer uses a light typeface for the logotype treatment and a small line of secondary copy. The type elements contrast nicely and the light type treatment seems to fit the mood of the imagery.

HTML Burger takes almost the opposite approach with a bold headline and small secondary lines of text. The lighter descriptive words work small because they are common words—HTML, CSS, e-commerce—and contrast significantly with the still-oversized headline.

Mountain Dew’s NBA design pushes everything to a small scale. This is one of the smallest headline treatments you’ll likely find, but combined with the overly bold X overlay and video background, users are still pulled to the tiny text.

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